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Reclaimed Wood Floor of the Year 2011

River Recovered Antique Heart Pine and Cypress


Goodwin Heart Pine floors win National Wood Floor Association Reclaimed Wood Floor of the Year again!

The millenium giant River Recovered Heart Cypress 53″ diameter log rounds were inset into a field of River Recovered Antique Pine floors and surrounded by Curly Heart Pine trim by Matt Marwick, Precision Floor Crafters, nearby Goodwin Heart Pine.

Matt’s passion for the sinker pine and cypress and his craftsmanship are a perfect match for Goodwin. These antique wooden floors are a tribute to the loggers that cut this tree down over 100 years ago.

Loggers from 1904 Show the Girth of a Giant Cypress

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5 Things to Learn About Antique Wood Floors in 5 Minutes

1. Help in choosing a reclaimed wood floor…River Recovered Antique Heart Pine Vertical Grain

To help you think about what you want here are a few choices:
· Do you want a unique wood floor with a story?
· A beautiful, historic and durable floor.
· Light, medium or dark tones?
· Consistent color or color variation?
· Grain with pin stripes, bold arches or subtle graining?
· A single width versus a random width pattern gives a different look?
· Do you like ‘character’ or prefer pristine?
· How about knots or do you want a ‘clear’ grade?
Maybe you just want to see a few of these characteristics in River Recovered Heart PineLegacy Heart PineRiver Recovered Heart Cypress… or Sustainably Harvested Woods.

Antique Heart Pine is the most frequently specified reclaimed wood.’Virgin growth’ heart pine is known as the ‘wood that built America’. It is mostly or all heartwood, is very hard and comes in many grades.

Some of the more commonly available reclaimed woods include: American Chestnut, Heart Cypress, Douglas Fir, Eastern White Pine and Oak.

2. Which finish should you use on reclaimed wood?

The finish you choose can dramatically change the look of your floor. While most reclaimed wood is sanded and finished smooth to the touch, you can also have a distressed floor. Distressing simulates old, old floors or barn siding and is usually done on milling machines, though it can also be done onsite by craftsmen.

How you want to maintain your wood floor determines if you want polyurethane that requires a professional to repair or if you want an oil finish that you can refresh when scratches occur. Polyurethane is a plastic coating that adds shine to the floor. The oil finishes are very natural and are low sheen; however, they can be made to have degrees of shine. They are especially appropriate for heavy traffic and come with easy maintenance products.

3. Would solid or engineered reclaimed wood work best for you?

Engineered wood flooring is a growing market. Goodwin began engineered flooring to help conserve the rare River Recovered® wood. While solid wood floor may remain the ‘gold standard’ for those who can accommodate its greater demands, now you can have ‘USA made’ engineered flooring that looks and lasts like solid and is easier to fit into the construction cycle.

4. Not all reclaimed wood is equal…

To consistently manufacture a well made reclaimed wood floor that is properly kiln-dried, precisely milled, graded to established standards and backed by in-house technical expertise requires a considerable investment. Reclaimed wood can be a confusing niche industry. You may want to know some terminology when specifying antique heart pine. Building design professionals can call for our free continuing education course on Architectural and Design Uses of Reclaimed Wood.

5. Installation tips to help your reclaimed wood perform well for a lifetime and beyond.

Once you have chosen your floor, learn what to ask; about installation, selecting an installer, even tips on existing subfloors on our blogs. Should you need stair parts or millwork it is possible to get any flooring complement in the same grade as your floor.

Engineered floor installation, when glued to concrete, needs to have an elastomeric type adhesive made for engineered wood. We generally suggest a vapor retarder over the slab. Even if the slab is dry now it ensures against leaks or storms.

Just a few of the important tips to help ensure your solid wood floor installation:
1. The sub floor needs to be flat and level to within 3/16” over 10 feet for nail down or flat within 1/8” over 6 feet for glue down installation.
2. The moisture content of the wood floor and the sub-floor need to match the expected indoor temperature and relative humidity once the building has been occupied. Be sure to use a pin type moisture meter on dense reclaimed wood.
3. Enough ‘cleats’ for nail down jobs will help prevent the floor from moving too much. You should nail a 6” inch wide floor every 4”, an 8” inch wide floor every 3”, etc.