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Submerged Logs Into Antique Pine Floors

Most of the River Recovered® pine used to produce heart pine flooring has been underwater for a century or more. Questions about this antique wood cover the entire spectrum from concerns that the wood will shrink extra after it is installed to the thought that long exposure to water might keep the wood from moving at all. Actually the answer lies in the middle of this range.

To start with, living trees have a high water content. Wood in its natural condition performs well when it is surrounded with water. The basic structure of the heart wood with high resin content changes very little during the long stay at the river bottom. The resin helps protect the heartwood underwater just as it protects the wood in a living tree.

The desirable properties of this antique wood come from the slow growing conditions. Original growth forests produced long leaf pine of a high density with high resin content. These characteristics are not changed while the wood is submerged.

Carefully kiln dried and matched in moisture content at the job site, this antique wood will give excellent performance as antique pine floors.

Antique Pine Reclaimed Wood for the Masters!

Goodwin teamed up with Akira Wood to replace the interior of the Oconee Golf Clubhouse at Reynolds Plantation just in time for the Masters Tournament. Here are panels and columns in Antique Heart Pine.

Another first! George Goodwin pulled a log from our sawmill log pond and Akira made the antique pine plywood made for the banquettes. More on this to come as it hasn’t been done before. Kudos and thanks to Akira Wood.

If You Think Antique Pine Flooring is Gorgeous…

Antique Heart Cypress "Tidewater Red" Brochure from 1904Here’s a brochure from the early 1900s touting the beauty of Tidewater Red Cypress. That’s about the end of the commercial availability of virgin growth, or original growth heart of cypress.

Today Goodwin offers River Recovered Antique Heart Cypress in many grades and milling patterns for paneling, cabinetry and millwork. We follow the 1904 grading standards, the last time any were published for this rare wood.

“New cypress looks almost like another specie”, says George Goodwin talking with Norm Abrams while they look at a 1,700 year old river recovered heart cypress log.